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Talent Journaling
The Psychological Elegance of Talent
The Hathaway Epics
The Romantic Struggle
The Little Odyssey



Interviews

The Psychological Elegance of Talent


Hardcastle:
The Psychological Elegance of Talent is describes as, “written in exquisite metaphor, even flamboyant metaphor and with artistic story-telling.” Here’s another one – a review by the Constant Reader: “This is a tremendous piece of literature that both energizes as it teaches. The writing is above outstanding.”

Not bad.


Hathaway:
Thank you.

Hardcastle:
What benefit will we receive from reading it?


Hathaway:
There will be many benefits. One will be the understanding of how we discover our talent. But the more important benefits will be understanding how the unfulfilled wish works in concert with the fulfilled wish. This involves what I call cerebral mechanics and especially the equilibrium of the conscious and unconscious mind.

Hardcastle:
By the way, the book has a beautiful cover. It’s an oil painting. It’s by Vermeer, isn’t it?


Hathaway:
Yes. That’s Johannes Vermeer. The original is in Vienna.

Hardcastle:
Why was this cover selected?


Hathaway:
Well, it’s a painting of Vermeer using his talent. It’s titled, The Art of Painting.

Hardcastle:
You gave it the title, The Psychological Elegance of Talent. Why not just the Psychology of Talent? In other words, what’s the significance of the word elegance?


Hathaway:
Well, there is an elegance that takes place in the mind when we use our talent. It’s the coming together of the conscious and unconscious mind which are two polar twins that naturally repel one another. They are at enmity by nature. But their unique balance while under the influence of talent is an elegant thing.

Hardcastle:
You carefully describe the conscious and unconscious mind in your book. Tell our audience why this is so important to understand The Psychological Elegance of Talent?


Hathaway:
To begin to appreciate … just to begin to appreciate the stunning brilliance of the psychological elegance of talent – and here I’m speaking of the concept rather than my book – I’m not proclaiming my book as brilliant – it’s the elegance that is brilliant. And to understand this elegance we must possess a elementary understanding of the conscious and unconscious. So, that is why I take some time explaining them … and I hope I do it in way that is appealing. I tell stories to illustrate the nature of the conscious and unconscious.

Hardcastle:
In your book, you claim that all of our past experiences, whether good or bad, can be used to empower our talent. Now, quite frankly, some people have had some extremely bad experiences – even tragedies. Do you really think such horrible memories can be used to strengthen someone’s talent?


Hathaway:
Yes. Absolutely, yes. All those bad experiences are energy for the super-engine which I call the vita. The vita is the life wish, so to speak. It drives all the needs in our life. Maslow’s hierarchy of needs are all driven by the vita. The need for food and water – social needs – the need for self-realization – all are driven by the vita which is empowered by all our life episodes, whether good or bad.

Hardcastle:
You’ve divided the book in two parts: “The Unfulfilled Wish” and the “Fulfilled Wish”. What do the unfulfilled wish and the fulfilled wish have to do with talent?


Hathaway:
The unfulfilled wish must and will be expressed. It resides in the unconscious which is many times more powerful than the conscious mind so it always overrides the conscious mind. When we see powerfully talented people, we see them releasing their unfulfilled wishes.

Hardcastle:
You use a big word in your book – Psychosymmetry. What does it mean?


Hathaway:
Psychosymmetry is my theory that cerebral equilibrium can only be achieved during the use of our talent. Psychosymmetry is the balance of the conscious and unconscious mind.

Hardcastle:
In your book, you say that “talent is the perfect antidote to unbelief.” What does that mean?


Hathaway:
The discovery and use and development of our talent … not in a … ah, not in a casual way but in a unreserved way, in a full and serious way, influences our self-concept. We begin to believe in ourselves. So, unbelief is banished – to a degree and for a while – by the use of our talent.

Hardcastle:
Another thing you said in your book that was intriguing is that we all miss playing as a child and that we should never stop playing. Tell the audience about this idea.


Hathaway:
Right. We should mature and develop as adults, taking on adult responsibilities. Yet, we should never stop playing. Finding and developing our talent is the way adults play. This way, we never are reluctant to go to work. Work becomes a magnet just as the playground was a magnet to us when we were children. This does not mean that work is never hard and difficult. Sometimes it’s still difficult. But it’s also irresistible and fascinating in a way that allows long periods of uninterrupted concentration, just the way we played and played for hours without tiring as children.

Hardcastle:
“The Author’s Foreword”, your foreword, was a wonderful description of children playing at recess. Was this somewhat autobiographical?


Hathaway:
Oh, yes! Yes, that was from playing on the playground.

After being in class for hours and somewhat tortured with tedium, we were released for recess – I remember laughing and running as fast as I could to all the hilarity and joys of the playground. That was triumph. It was all we wanted. Just to play and laugh and be free. We were being ourselves and we never became tired of being ourselves.

We could have played there for hours without lapses in concentration – free to express ourselves in a thousand unique ways.

Hardcastle:
Is that a description of Psychosymmetry?


Hathaway:
Yes. An elementary description but an accurate one.

Hardcastle:
Do you use Psychosymmetry in your day-to-day life?


Hathaway:
I try to. I write everyday. Much of what I do, however, is promotional work. But it’s like writing, in a way, because at least I’m talking about my talent and the books I’ve written.

One of the problems I have is getting too many ideas for new books. I’ve written about ten books. But I simply can’t get to all the new ideas. This is why I have written a book of short stories and short novels. It’s titled, The Romantic Struggle; Ten Short Stories and Two Short Novels. I have another whole book or two of short stories that will follow and a few novels, too.

Hardcastle:
How has writing this book affected your life?


Hathaway:
It has helped me crystallize many ideas and concepts and theories. And by the way, the book is only about 137 pages or so in length. It’s really just an essay on the subject. But, nonetheless, it has been extremely helpful in at least recording the formula, so to speak, for Psychosymmetry.

Hardcastle:
What would you say is the central message of The Psychological Elegance of Talent?


Hathaway:
It is this: talent allows us to become and to remain our original self.

Hardcastle:
What is the most important thing that readers will receive from reading this book?


Hathaway:
Those who have not discovered their talent may find help in doing so from reading this book. A virtuoso can even be helped by understanding more fully the necessity of using his or her talent.

Hardcastle:
So, do you see The Psychological Elegance of Talent as cure-all?


Hathaway:
No. Oh, no. Not at all. It may be good for some neurosis. But if it helps improve our lives by five percent, is it worth it?

Hardcastle:
There must have been some great inspiration that caused you to write this book. Was there such an inspiration?


Hathaway:
Yes, there was. One day I was reading a book about Freud. A reporter asked him, “What is a normal person?” He answered, “Anyone who works and loves.”

That was a psychological moment in my life. The poignancy of that simple answer inspired me to write a book of essays about working and loving and from that came my theory, Psychosymmetry followed by the book, The Psychological Elegance of Talent.

Hardcastle:
Was there anything else that inspired this book?


Hathaway:
My own struggles for self identity.

It is an unsettling thing for a man to not use his talent. I unwittingly forsook my talent by following what others did or strongly suggested and so sought the job that paid the most. In so doing, I lost touch with my true self. And all along, I was suppressing the source of my true self – my talent.

Fortunately, the Universe is a forgiving place and it is easy to return to our original self.

Hardcastle:
Now, if people decide that they want to read The Psychological Elegance of Talent, where do they buy it?


Hathaway:
You can purchase it on Amazon.com.

Hardcastle:
What else would you like to tell us about The Psychological Elegance of Talent?


Hathaway:
Spend some time with this book. Go to a quiet place where you can read it undisturbed. Study it. For, remember, it’s about your original self.
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